A diagnosis

I went to a specialist this afternoon. He performed some tests and confirmed that my injury is a sacroilliac joint dysfunction. My particular version of the injury is excessively loose ligaments in the right sacroilliac joint. It is likely that I actually suffered the injury as a child or teenager through a hard impact (though I don’t remember any hard impacts other than knowing that I once fell off a rearing horse) and that my legs tightened to compensate. With the treatment to my legs, which have loosened, the sacroilliac joint has lost its artificial support.

The specialist recommended prolotherapy. Actually, he wasn’t interested in discussing any other less expensive or invasive options with me, leading me to form the conclusion that he was just churning people in and out for money. In fairness, I only met the man once but as soon as I started asking questions like, “Is the treatment permanent?” and “What other options are available for treatment?”, the specialist seemed annoyed. I have done some reading about prolotheraphy and am not convinced about the science; it seems a little like quackery to me but that’s just my personal opinion. The fact that the specialist said I’d need a refresher treatment every two years was enough to make me realise its just a bandaid.

The good news is that I can’t make the injury worse by running, cycling or kayaking. I can only aggravate it so that it causes pain. I spoke with my physio (who is an incredibly patient man who I actually trust and who I know has my best interests at heart). Tomorrow we will put a plan in place for forward progress. This plan will include pilates classes and changing my running technique to reduce the pressure on my body.

My personal plan is to include aromatherapy, yoga, core strength and massage into my routine. I am also going to look into a lumbar support for when I run, hike and kayak. In the worst case, I’ll switch from running to cycling. But I’ll cross that bridge if I get to it.

In the meantime, I bought myself a copy of Ride by Josh Kench. The blurb on the back and flicking through a few pages inspired me so I’m looking forward to reading it. Who knows what crazy ideas I might come up with as a result πŸ˜‰

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2 responses to “A diagnosis

  1. Trust your instincts. If the guy became irritated when you started asking questions, sounds like you need to move on and seek help elsewhere. Just my opinion.

    • Oh yeah. Don’t worry about that πŸ™‚ I won’t be going back. While medical practitioners have the training, it is still my body they are treating so if they won’t discuss options or won’t listen to me or won’t ask me questions, then I walk away. This bloke didn’t even ask me what my goals are, whether I play sport and if so, what sport. He just told me what he wanted to tell me. So I listened, paid my money and left. I read the material he gave me to read and it was quite self-serving. I also did further research and am making an informed decision based on that research.

      I used to be one of those people who just did what their medical practitioner said. Now I expect more from them. I am now an informed consumer πŸ˜‰

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