Category Archives: Walking

Great North Walk Day 3 (4 July): Tunk Ridge bush camp to Ridge Top bush camp

Check out the split in the tree

Check out the split in the tree

Time of writing: 6:00am 4 July

I woke before the dawn. It gets light so late here in Cockroach Country. At home, 1,000km north, the day is begun by 6:00am but here it is still dark. At least it gave me privacy for my morning wash; we are close to suburbia after all.

Despite her crescent state, the Moon still shines brightly. I was able to lay in her beams as I did some morning stretches. I’m trying to stretch my whole body at least twice a day to keep the soreness to a minimum. So far, I’ve rolled each ankle twice and have quite some shoulder soreness from carrying the pack. The ankle rolling always occurs when I let my mind drift to hardships or try to push the pace rather than enjoying the now. A lesson perhaps.

It must be rubbish day in Hornsby for I can hear the truck off in the distance. How odd that for these two weeks I am not part of that world. For these two weeks I am like a vagabond to those who wear suits and ties. Maybe a figure of someone they want to become or a symbol of what they’ve given up. I’ll see them this morning at the station with their takeaway coffees and sullen faces. Already my trail mind is taking over. How quickly I slip out of my corporate mode and into the role of observer. The land is taking hold. A good omen for my future travels.

Time of writing: 11:23am 4 July

So I’m sitting on a rocky outcrop overlooking Berowra Creek. I can’t be too far from Berowra Waters. The track down from the train station at Berowra has been beautiful. It’s cut down through rocky tree-covered hills across running creeks and past trees of interesting shapes (including one with stumpy branches that made it look like a male fertility charm). The bush is alive with colour and sounds. White flowers are starting to bloom on low growing shrubs. Orange candlesticks adorn Banksias, which grow well in the sandy soil. Fresh new gum growth glows red as the sun hits it. Tree trunks come in black, brown, pink and silver. The views are punctuated by orange and grey cliffs. The wind is strong, creating a whoosh of leaves that fluctuates in intensite while branches rubbing against each other squeek and squwark. I’ve heard whip birds call for mates and have seen a lyer bird scratching around. It is a grand day to be walking.

Time of writing: 4:20pm 4 July

Feeling on top of the world

Feeling on top of the world

I’m at bush camp not far from Turner Road, Berowra. It’s been  a really good day today getting here.

View from Steele Bridge

View from Steele Bridge

Check out the split in the tree

Check out the split in the tree

My day started off with a stiff hike to Hornsby Station. The first 2km were steep downhill on fire trail back to Steele Bridge. Then I had a hard 3-4km climb to Hornsby and on to the train station. Along the way, a friendly man helped me with directions. The train ride to Berowra was uneventful but I’m glad I took it because I’ve since learned that the track was definitely impassable north of Crosslands (Calna Creek).

The detour

The detour

At Berowra I treated myself to a meat pie. It was pretty tasty and actually seemed to have meat in it. From here, I re-enterd the bush and you can read about the hike down to Berowra Waters in my 11:23am notes.

Berowra Waters wasn’t much. I stopped for lunch at some shady picnic tables near parked cars, topped up my water for the overnight hike and set off up to camp.

These rocks are thigh-high on me

These rocks are thigh-high on me

The trail up to Ridge Top

The trail up to Ridge Top

That's the trail up those rocks

That’s the trail up those rocks

The climb out of Berowra Waters was intensely physical. In south-east Queensland uphill trails are groomed or scrambly. Here, I had to climb boulders and steps the whole way up. Many steps were thigh to waist high on me.

But oh my! The views! And the pure rugged beauty of the place. Magic! So worth the effort.

Along the way I crossed a creed so beautiful I had to stop. Water flowed over a small foot-high cascade, onto a slab of rock and into a shallow pool before dropping down a 3-5m waterfall below me. The water was icy cold so I coolled my face and hair before taking off my stinky shirt to rinse it and my upper body. I stayed a while before continuing to climb.

The view west from Ridge Top bush camp

The view west from Ridge Top bush camp

Camp is pretty. There’s plenty of space but it’s bushland not a field. About 20m away there is an amazing vista over the mountains to th ewest. That’s where I’m going shortly (to look at the view).

I’m sharing camp with about 15 Duke of Edinburough teens and their leaders from The Colloroy Centre. Once again, life on the trail is sociable (I’ve had yarns with randoms all day).

Total: 18km hiking with 24-28kg pack

Food

  • semolina pudding with sultanas
  • Organic Food bar
  • pie
  • fruit puree
  • hot chocolate custard
  • beef jerkey noodle soup with vegetables
  • 6 x Vita Wheat crackers with plum jam
  • Milo bar
  • oat bar
  • devil’s lentils (lentils, tomatoes, mushrooms, vegies, herbs and Parmesan cheese)

Links

Great North Walk Day 2 (3 July): Baden Powell Scout camp to Tunk Ridge bush camp

Morning on the trail

Morning on the trail

Time of writing: 6:00pm 3 July

I luxuriated in the conveniences of the Scout camp this morning: a hot shower, a microwave, and power and internet connection. It all led to a relatively late 8:00am start to my second day on the GNW.

It took a while to get from the Scout camp back to the track. I missed a turn on my way out and had to backtrack a couple of hundred metres. But I was soon on my way.

A quiet place to sit

A quiet place to sit

The track took me to Thornleigh Oval then through suburban streets before I again entered bushland. The sun filtered through the trees and morning air giving off a white glowing light. It was cool and sheltered along the track under the cliffs to my east. Before long I was sitting on a rock just enjoying the moment. I’d already walked 4km and deserved the break.

Boiling the billy

Boiling the billy

Another 2km of walking through pretty green bushland punctuated by sandstone brought me to The Jungo; the junction of Berowra and Zig Zag Creeks. There wasn’t much there so I continued a few hundred metres to Berowra Creek where there was a small sandy beach. Here I cooked up a cup of tea and listened to the gurgle of the creek; a sound I would become used to as the day wore on.

The Benowie Track

The Benowie Track

As I walked, I paid close attention to my surrounds. The creek gurgled away to my left most of the day. Up to my right, sandstone boulders and crags dominated the bushland. Sometimes I’d have to walk up to the top and this would open out views of thickly treed mountains to my west. Incredibly, I was rarely more than a few hundred metres from suburban homes but I almost never saw them. I felt quite immersed in the bush: so beautiful and thick it was.

The Spa

The Spa

I stopped for lunch at The Spa; a crazy water feature on Waitara Creek. Circular holes drop through rocks creating a powerful and strange whirlpooling cascade. Crossing it was quite daunting so I ended up emptying my pack and carrying the dry sacks inside across separately to reduce the weight. With all my gear out of my pack and it being midday, it seemed only sensible to eat. I have to admit that I felt quite uneasy at The Spa. Something told me that I wasn’t meant to be there but I was so hungry that I had to ignore it.

From The Spa I walked on to The Fish Ponds. I’m not quite sure the significance of this pool of water, which is dominated by “Danger people have died swimming here” signs (talk about visual pollution). About an hour later I came to the Steele Bridge. Here I talked with some young men about 16-18 years old. I suspect they were Army Cadets because they wore fatigues and were eating Army rations. None needed to shave yet but all were taller than me. They looked rather odd (can I say silly?) in uniform, especially the one carrying a black piece of plastic or cardboard that was meant to be a practice rifle.

Tunk Ridge bush camp

Tunk Ridge bush camp

Two kilometres later (all of which was uphill), I rached Tunk Ridge bush camp where I camped tonight. It’s an odd location just 2-3km from major suburban areas but still totally quiet. I arrived around 2:00pm and have been lazing around all afternoon resting, stretching, writing, eating and talking to the  random people walking or running along the tracks. Mostly I’ve been trying to gleen information about the trail ahead. I have learned that the Calna Bridge is down and that the track from Calna Creek to Sam Creek is impassable due to heavy rainfalls. If that’s the case, I need to backtrack to Hornsby to catch a train to Berowra. no one I spoke to could hep me. It’s 10km each way to that section of track. so I might err on the side of caution and catch the train. It wouldn’t be good to have to camp back here again tomorrow if I can’t get through.

Total: 18km hike with 30kg pack (I carried extra water for the bush camp)

Food

  • oats with cinnamon, fruit, nuts and honey
  • Milo bar
  • fruit puree
  • oat bar
  • Organic Food bar
  • 6 x Vita Wheat crackers and sweet chili tuna
  • tomato, vegetable and lentil soup
  • macaroni, beef jerkey and veg with Parmesan cheese

Links

Stockton siesta

image

24 hours after finishing the Great North Walk I watched the sun set over Stockton’s Shipwreck Walk.

I’ve had an easy day. I spent an hour typing up the first few data of my walk notes at the library but couldn’t upload my photos but it will speed up the process when I get home.

I’ve enjoyed chatting with other guests here at camp. Hearing all their stories helps me understand mine. It’s a good chance to get perspective on the more mundane things in life: work, money, house … that sort if thing.

Total: 6km walking

22kg on my back

Out walking by Andrew Gills
Out walking, a photo by Andrew Gills on Flickr.

It’s now less than two weeks until I set off on my Great North Walk hike. As the time gets closer, I’m becoming more excited about the trip. But the reality of lugging my pack all day is also starting to set in.

I weighed my pack yesterday and it weighs 22kg (48lbs). I’m hoping to get it down to 20kg (44lbs) but there are certain things I’m hesitant to leave behind so it’s a challenging process.

While saving grams might help a bit, the reality is that the human body and mind are amazing things. They can adjust to almost any hardship if given time.

The first three to four days of a long trek are always the most difficult. That’s when the mind is battling excitement and nerves about the adventure ahead. And when the body is not yet used to the fact that it won’t get to sit at a desk all day long (though my body and soul hate sitting at a desk all day).

To make the first three to four days of my hike easier, I’ve decided to get out walking with my full pack at least once a day every day until I leave. This will help fine tune my fitness so that I can enjoy the first few days of my hike instead of being in discomfort.

Total:

  • Tuesday: 5km walk with 22kg pack
  • Wednesday: 5km walk with 22kg pack

Oxfam Trailwalker Brisbane 2013 – Trail marking

Trail marking kit

Trail marking kit

A small army of volunteers hit the Oxfam Trailwalker Brisbane trail today. Our task: to hang the markings that will guide the 1,100 walkers through their 100km odyssey. The army consisted of seven teams of three to four volunteers. Each team walked one stage of the course hanging numbered yellow markers every 100m and big red arrows at every intersection.

Views on the way to the trail

Views on the way to the trail

I started the day by riding my motorbike up to Mt Glorious over the Mt Nebo Scenic Route. After a week of rain, the sun was shining and clouds hung low in the valley, promising a perfect day for walking.

Volunteering made fun

Volunteering made fun

There’s no easy way to mark the trail: we volunteers simply had to walk our section of track. Not that it was a hardship – rarely are there volunteering opportunities that both help a fantastic charity and get you outdoors hiking in the bush. It was certainly worth taking one of my annual leave days off work.

Lunch at England Creek (Right Branch)

Lunch at England Creek (Right Branch)

I only met my walking companions today at the start of the trail. But over the course of the next seven hours we got to know a little about each other, shared some laughs and found a delightful spot for lunch on the banks of England Creek (Right Branch). I knew this lunch spot was here from my walk down here the other weekend when I completed a recce of the first half of the section of the Trailwalker course that we marked today.

Views from the trail

Views from the trail

The first half of our walk traveled downhill through dense forest. We then crossed England Creek, which was about calf deep. Then we spent the rest of the walk climbing back out of the valley to the top of the range. Actually, the photo in my ‘About me’ page of me sitting on the track in the Oxfam Trailwalker 2011 was taken in the same spot as I was standing when I took this photo of the view. How things have changed. But one thing hasn’t: that view made the long uphill grind worth it.

For the next two days I’ll be out at the event supporting my sister’s team of walkers. I can’t wait.

Total: 17km hike

Learning more about Aboriginal culture

wpid-2012-07-28-08.13.29.jpg

Like many Australians of my generation, I am largely ignorant about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples’ cultures. I remember doing a project about Aboriginal people in primary school – it involved bark huts, boomerangs and that photo of the Aboriginal man standing on one leg with spear in hand. During my five years in high school, the word Aboriginal wasn’t mentioned except to describe the people we saw sitting in Fortitude Valley’s Brunswick Street Mall. As a student of criminology, Aboriginal people were merely described as statistics, reported in the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. And then, in law school, the only mention of Aboriginal people was a brief summary of the Mabo case. I’m currently studying education and it looks like the only mention the First People of Australia will be a token discussion in the one subject about diversity in education.

Over the past couple of years, my professional life has given me cause to read all the government reports and some academic articles about Australia’s hidden history. It’s been an eye opener and has created in me a need to learn more about the people and culture behind the statistics.

Last week, I had the good fortune of attending a Learning Circle hosted by Reconciliation Australia. During the function, we who are not of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Island heritage were challenged to take action to learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people’s cultures.

But where to start? I mean, how am I going to find time or information to even know where to start? Let alone actually learn something meaningful about Aboriginal culture? And aren’t there lots of different Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island cultures? Oh it’s too hard to even start.

Those were the thoughts that swam around my head as I rode the bus home that afternoon. And then it came to me – I am just making the same excuses that were made by those who set my educational curriculum all those decades ago. Here I am demanding the world accept, respect and understand my experiences as a transgender man yet I am making excuses rather than making the effort to learn more about the culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people.

Almost instantly after I opened my mind to possibilities rather than limitations, a plan formed in my mind.

When I leave Sydney on the Great North Walk on 2 July, I will be doing more than just walking the 250km to Newcastle; I will be taking the next step in my journey to learn more about Aboriginal culture. During the hike, I want to:

  1. be respectful of Aboriginal beliefs during my walk by confirming that the trail doesn’t travel through or over any sacred sites
  2. learn about the stories of the land and Traditional Owners of the lands through which I travel
  3. participate in a NAIDOC week activity during the walk (or immediately after if logistics prevent me from attending an activity en-route).

I am currently hoping to make contact with people who can help me learn more about Aboriginal culture and history, particularly in the country between Sydney and Newcastle. Perhaps someone has a website or can recommend a book. Maybe I will be blessed to find someone who will meet me on their country to tell me a story or two.

I am just an ordinary Australian. I’m not a journalist. I’m not an activist. But I believe the future is what we make of it. And I don’t want to be part of the problem anymore.

Walking with my partner

I'm such a sensible man ... not

I’m such a sensible man … not

I have the day off today to spend time with my partner (she’s a shift / weekend worker). We started our day with a delightful 5km walk around our neighbourhood. It’s a fantastic chance for us to catch up on all we’ve missed in the week that we’ve been like ships passing through the night.

The wallaby that lives in our street

The wallaby that lives in our street

Thanks to my new digital camera, I managed to capture a photo of the wallaby that lives in our street. I think it’s the first wallaby / kangaroo photo I’ve managed to share here on this Australian blog.

A "poop tree"

A “poop tree”

It’s winter so the wattles are starting to bloom and the old wattles are starting to grow “poop”. I know there’s probably a scientific and botanical explanation for these ugly growths but to me they’ve always made me think of “poop” so I call these trees “poop trees”. I couldn’t resist taking a photo.

The scrub turkey's nest

The scrub turkey’s nest

We have a scrub turkey who is building a nest. Last year he built a mammoth mound but didn’t have any success in breeding (though we do believe he might have found a mate). This year he’s trying again. Scrub turkeys build big mounds of leaf litter and bark. The turkeys themselves aren’t that big, last year, this bird’s mound was about 60cm (2′) high and 3m (10′) across.

The leaf litter the scrub turkey is stealing for his nest

The leaf litter the scrub turkey is stealing for his nest

To create his mound, the scrub turkey ‘steals’ leaf litter and mulch from far and wide. All the leaf litter on the path has been scratched there by our local turkey and will all find its way onto the mount. Last year, the turkey took mulch from the gardens across the road from here and scratched it all the way across to it’s nest too.

Total: 5km walk

England Creek (Right Branch) hike

Our route is in yellow highlighter

Our route is in yellow highlighter (map courtesy of Oxfam Trailwalker Brisbane)

Yesterday, I led my first ever off-track hike. I haven’t done any off-track walking since I was a member of the Brisbane Bushwalkers Club about a decade ago but since being involved in adventure racing and rogaining, I’ve gained quite a bit of confidence in navigation. I put it to the test at England Creek (Right Branch) yesterday in a low risk navigational exercise. I invited my fellow Scout leaders along on the hike and one said ‘yes’.

Morning views from Joyners Ridge Road

Morning views from Joyners Ridge Road

We started out walk at the top of Mt Glorious. The skies were overcast and a light drizzle fell, but the views to the north as we dropped down off Joyners Ridge Road were fantastic. Clouds hung low in the valleys and the mountain peaks were almost like drifting islands.

England Creek (Right Branch)

England Creek (Right Branch)

The walk down to England Creek follows the first 7.5km of the Oxfam Trailwalker Brisbane route so it will be familiar to many local walkers. It follows Joyners Ridge Road and then turns left onto England Creek Road at a major intersection. Once down at the creek, my friend and I stopped for a brief picnic on a rock before leaving the track to head upstream into the jungle.

We were still trying to keep our feet dry here

We were still trying to keep our feet dry here

At first we rock hopped carefully, trying to keep our feet dry. I never know why I always do this on trips or events when I know that there’s no chance of staying dry. It’s like I’m putting off the inevitable. But it must waste so much energy.

Trying not to fall into the water

Trying not to fall into the water

By the time we got to this deep pool bordered by dangerously slippery rocks, I had given up keeping my feet wet.

I need to get to the other side so might as well jump in after all

I need to get to the other side so might as well jump in after all

That was fun

That was fun

And then when I realised I needed to get to the other side, I just jumped straight in.

There were lots of little gorge sections

There were lots of little gorge sections

The creek runs relatively low at this time of year after all the summer rains have finished and washed through the catchment area. But through each of the little gorges it was obvious that water often rushes through here much more quickly and at a higher level: just check out all the wear on those rocks.

What a beautiful part of the world

What a beautiful part of the world

As we trekked upstream I couldn’t help but think about how beautiful this part of the world is and how lucky I am to have it on my doorstep.

Impossibly tall palm trees along the creek

Impossibly tall palm trees along the creek

Dwarfed by the palm trees

Dwarfed by the palm trees

While rock hopping, it can be tempting to focus all your attention on your footing and on the creek itself. But when you look up and around, you can see what a complex ecosystem places like this are. Check out the impossibly tall palm trees that looked over us as we tiny humans meandered our way upstream.

One of the many swimming holes that would be amazing in summer

One of the many swimming holes that would be amazing in summer

England Creek (Right Branch) would be an even more amazing walk in late spring or early summer when the weather is warm (but not yet oppressively humid or wet). It’s dotted with these beautiful swimming holes and rock slabs that would make perfect places to have a picnic and swim.

A pretty series of cascades

A pretty series of cascades

It also contains many pretty cascades. I am sure that in late summer when we’re in the middle of our wet season, these would be imposing and scary. But yesterday they were just plain pretty. That’s not to say they weren’t treacherous.

Scrambling up some slippery rocks

Scrambling up some slippery rocks

My mate just walked across the log

My mate just walked across the log

Even the rock slabs that look dry were perilously slippery and required careful negotiation.In many of these cascades, we scrambled up the actual falls where the flowing water stopped moss from growing.

As it climbed, the trees closed in around the creek

As it climbed, the trees closed in around the creek

We knew we were starting to get into the upper reaches of the creek when the forest closed in more tightly around us and the light grew dimmer. The water volume reduced, the creek bed turned to stones and the going was more slippery than lower down where we had the option of walking on gravel. But by now we’d been in the creek for about three hours and it had become our entire existence, making the change in terrain feel natural.

The rocks in the upper reaches are slippery and seem constantly wetI can imagine the water rushing through here in the wet season; it must be spectacular. Now, in the dry, it’s just plain beautiful.

At these cascades we decided to exit the creek

At these cascades we decided to exit the creek

After following the creek for almost four hours, we reached our critical decision point. We had to decide whether to swim across a water hole and climb through the flowing water or whether to make our escape out of the creek back to the ridge 600 vertical metres above us to finish the hike along Joyners Ridge Road. We could see from the map and terrain that from this point there would be many more cascades than there is flat creek. We also knew from our descent and map that the forest would close in more densely the higher we traveled. It was also between 1:30pm – 2:00pm, which was the time at which we agreed we would start looking for an escape route so that we could be sure to get out of the bush by dark.

Bashing our way uphill through the jungle

Bashing our way uphill through the jungle

So we turned north-west and started to climb through the thick jungle and lawyer vine.

My mate is only about 20m behind me but is barely visible

My mate is only about 20m behind me but is barely visible

We climbed until we could see patches of grass starting to dot the ground, knowing this meant we were nearing a ridge or spur.

We have to go that way

We have to go that way

We just kept traveling uphill until we came to a clear spur and then we climbed some more. Occasionally we saw evidence that other humans had been here: a mug half-buried in the ground, some lantana that had been hacked with a machete months ago and was starting to grow back, and the odd section of small landslide where a group of people had obviously all slid the same way. The evidence of humans was subtle and could have been made months ago by a single group. But it was still a good sign for us as we climbed the seemingly endless spur.

For those unfamiliar with lantana ... it has prickles

For those unfamiliar with lantana … it has prickles

At the top of the spur we reached a ridge that was totally infested by lantana. The horrible weed rose like a two metre high wall in front of us and it was at least ten metres deep. We knew that the track should have been at the top of the ridge so it took us by surprise that the terrain dropped off again. But instead of panicking or second guessing myself, I told my mate to stop for a minute so we could get our bearings. I tracked a few metres north on the ridge until I could see further west and there it was, the big wide track meandering it’s way up to Mt Glorious. We were on precisely the ridge I had thought we were on as we climbed and, as I suspected, this was the only place where the track ran just off the ridge line. The reading and mental practice I’ve been doing paid off in real life.

Back out on the track for the final few kilometres

Back out on the track for the final few kilometres

We followed Joyners Ridge Road the final few kilometres back to the car, having thoroughly enjoyed a day out in the bush. I have plans to do some more local off-track hikes to continue to develop my navigation skills, both for my own enjoyment and for the adventure races / rogains team Whoops Witch Way are going to tackle later in the year.

Total: 15km off-track hike

Taking stock for the second half of 2013

Old faithful by Andrew Gills
Old faithful, a photo by Andrew Gills on Flickr.

I’ve had a fantastic five months of racing since January, both as an individual and as part of team Whoops Witch Way. I’ve achieved all the goals I set for myself and many more. Now, with winter setting in, it’s time for me to get back to take stock and refocus on some new goals for the second half of 2013.

I took a total rest day yesterday to recharge my batteries. I didn’t do any training, work, university study or social commitments. Rather, I slept, watched television and surfed the internet.. It was just grand.

So, what are the bones on which the second half of 2013 will be built?

  • On 2 July I leave for a 12 day solo hike along the 250km Great North Walk from Sydney to Newcastle
  • On 3 August, I will be running the Brisbane Marathon with the goal of taking lots of photos and enjoying about 5 hours out on the course
  • On 15-16 November, team Whoops Witch Way hope to tackle the Dark Side 18 hour adventure race (if we can find a third team member)
  • In December (I have to fix a date this week before the cheap airfares get booked out), I will be flying to Launceston (Tasmania) to bike pack the 480km Tasmanian Trail.

So the next 5-6 months promise a little less racing but a lot more camping, hiking and bike packing adventures (my partner is buying me a bike packing kit from a local supplier).

To kick start it this morning, I loaded 11.5kg of gear into my hiking pack and went on a 5km walk with my partner. I think I might try to keep doing these pack walks leading up to the Great North Walk so I am fit and strong to carry all my gear for the 12 days.

Total: 5km walk with 11.5kg pack

My partner & I went for a hike

My partner & I hiking by Andrew Gills
My partner & I hiking, a photo by Andrew Gills on Flickr.

I’m fortunate to live just 7.6km from my parents house. Not only that, but most of the 7.6km walk to their place is along bush trails.

Tonight, my partner came home from work and we went hiking to my parents place. While the trip is familiar to me, it was the first time my partner has taken this walk with me. She loved it. And I saw the bush in a different light as I saw it through her eyes.

I’ve first started exploring this bushland twenty years ago when we moved into the area, so I haven’t seen it through new eyes for a long time. But today I really saw the contours, the colours and the trails differently as I pointed out where we were going and where we had come from. It was magnificent.

Until it rained. We exited the bush and started walking up Mum’s street when the heavens opened and cold rain fell onto us. We were saturated and shivering in no time, making the final 1.6km stretch of walk much less pleasant than the first 6km had been. Fortunately, Mum and Dad had towels and dry clothes for us to borrow, and were heading to our place so could drop us home (we were going to ride my motorbike home because I left it there the other day).

Total: 7.63km bushwalk with 8kg pack